Gems in a quiet spot

Summer holidays mean schools and universities are quiet little spots where it is usually a hotbed of movement. At the Brynmor Jones Library at the University of Hull, there is a spot full of some beautiful pieces that just exude peace and quiet! Some of my favourite artists are represented here and it was a … Continue reading Gems in a quiet spot

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La Mitrailleuse as muse

When your favourite band decide to pay tribute to your favourite war painting and produce a video to compliment the musique concrete on offer, well it would be rude not to include it in the blog!               Yesterday, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark released a track from their forthcoming … Continue reading La Mitrailleuse as muse

Claggett Wilson – War Artist

Reading this article in the New York Times revealed a large gap in my art history knowledge of America:  http://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/01/05/arts/design/review-world-war-i-the-quick-the-dead-the-artists.html I've been reading a lot about the Ashcan Group, the Precisionists, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art, but seemed to have totally missed the War art produced by a range of American artists.  One, whose work … Continue reading Claggett Wilson – War Artist

Nevinson’s ‘Broken Reeds’

Studying this work by CRW Nevinson, 'Rain and Mud After the Battle' brought to mind a poem by Edward Thomas from 1916, called 'Rain': Rain, midnight rain, nothing but the wild rain  On this bleak hut, and solitude, and me  Remembering again that I shall die  And neither hear the rain nor give it thanks  … Continue reading Nevinson’s ‘Broken Reeds’

Gino Severini, Cannoni in azione 1915

Anyone who knows me will know how much I love the period 1910-1920 and I am bowled over by this wonderful work by Severini that I found in Rovereto. Immediately, I knew it had to be the companion to one of my most favourite paintings of all...drum roll... CRW Nevinson's La Mitrailleuse.  Wouldn't you agree? … Continue reading Gino Severini, Cannoni in azione 1915

My 100th Post: The 1910 Room at The Tate

To celebrate my 100th post, I thought a quick look at my favourite art period was called for. These two photographs epitomise what it is I love about the 1910 room at The Tate. I hadn't considered the way in which the pieces are placed together before so decided to photograph the statues alongside the … Continue reading My 100th Post: The 1910 Room at The Tate

Some you win, some you lose

In addition to the exhibitions, I'm also looking to visit smaller galleries in search of a certain number of artists I am interested in: Christopher Nevinson, David Bomberg, Paul Nash and Stanley Spencer.Leamington Spa Gallery was my first attempt - they have a Spencer and a Nevinson in their collection. It would be easy to call them … Continue reading Some you win, some you lose

Now you see him…now you don’t!

My favourite section of Tate Britain has to be the moment I turn into the 1910 and 1915 rooms. Everyone I love is there: Nevison, Epstein, Gertler, Bomberg, Wyndham Lewis to name but a few. There has been a rehang and the two rooms are now combined. Bomberg's Mud Bath is now pride of place: These … Continue reading Now you see him…now you don’t!

Expressionism, Cubism and Vorticism at Higgins Bedford

I have developed a real love of Vorticism and the artists associated with that movement.  When this exhibition popped up, I had to make a decision whether a 90 minute drive was worth the chance that I would see some of the works of my favourite artists... it was! This exhibition was beautifully lit and … Continue reading Expressionism, Cubism and Vorticism at Higgins Bedford

Government Art Collection

Ever wondered where all the art we own is stored? Had a great opportunity to have a tour of the Government Art Collection last week with a terrific trio -you know who you are! It is a fascinating place to go to -hidden down a yard off the Tottenham Court Road. We were shown round … Continue reading Government Art Collection

Truth and Memory at the IWM

If I thought Manchester's Sensory War was an excellent exploration of the impact of war on all areas of society, IWM's two-part exhibition, Truth and Memory genuinely blew it out of the water. The opening painting 'Defeat of the Prussian Guard', depicting a victory by the 2nd Oxfordshire and Bucks Light Infantry*, was a perfect … Continue reading Truth and Memory at the IWM

First Trip of the Year: Part Two – The Sensory War

I was looking forward to this as I have a real love of war literature and anything that can link to the poetry and prose I enjoy is always worth visiting.  However, this exhibition turned out to be utterly compelling and devastating in turn. If I tried to explain all of the different areas, this … Continue reading First Trip of the Year: Part Two – The Sensory War