And It’s War! My latest essay Really enjoyed writing this, despite the grisly nature of the art! Nevinson, CRW; The Doctor (Art.IWM ART 725) © IWM. Original Source:


Peter Howson

If you take a look at the word cloud on the front page of the blog, it will instantly tell you about the art I have a real desire for.  One of the larger tags is for war art. However, the link will take you to mainly first world war and a little of the … Continue reading Peter Howson

Let’s hear it for the girls 9: Hilda Jillard

Thanks to Trent Art for tweeting this amazing oil - The Massacre of the Innocents Held at Newlyn Art Gallery in Cornwall, there is no detail on when this was painted. The second line of writing says 'How terrible are the Disasters of War' and the clothing of the victims and their murderers would seem … Continue reading Let’s hear it for the girls 9: Hilda Jillard

John Piper and the artistic war effort

At Tate Liverpool until 18th March is an interesting exploration of John Piper's work. If honest, I wasn't that gripped by his landscapes and abstractions although found the influence of Picasso et al on his abstract pieces interesting. However, when it came to his contribution as an official war artist in WW2, I was completely … Continue reading John Piper and the artistic war effort

Nevinson at The Met

In New York is an exhibition exploring the visual arts of World War 1. Marsden Hartley and Wilfred Owen: Queer voices of Memorial in Wartime This article about Marsden Hartley and Wilfred Owen, who feature in the exhibition, mentioned my favourite curmudgeon, CRW Nevinson, and how he was inspired by a poem by Siegfried Sassoon … Continue reading Nevinson at The Met

Art eats Art

Check out @Sothebys’s Tweet: To advertise their sale of the Nevinson painting: Sotheby's are using Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark's video for La Mitrailleuse: Art really does eat art!!!

Nevinson reaches dizzy heights Can just imagine Nevinson's delight at this piece of news "About bloody time!" you can hear him cry! Mind you, as lovely as this is, I still love our Column on the March at the BMaG And we all know how much I adore La Mitrailleuse!

La Mitrailleuse as muse

When your favourite band decide to pay tribute to your favourite war painting and produce a video to compliment the musique concrete on offer, well it would be rude not to include it in the blog! Yesterday, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark released a track from their forthcoming album, The Punishment of Luxury (named after … Continue reading La Mitrailleuse as muse

Estorick Collection

Don't often write about a venue but I can't recommend a visit to the Estorick Collection in Islington enough. Estorick Collection Website Nestled behind an brick wall, the newly extended and renovared building houses a magical collection of Italian Futurist art, collected by Mr and Mrs Estorick. If you want to see Balla, Carra, Russolo … Continue reading Estorick Collection

Claggett Wilson – War Artist

Reading this article in the New York Times revealed a large gap in my art history knowledge of America: I've been reading a lot about the Ashcan Group, the Precisionists, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art, but seemed to have totally missed the War art produced by a range of American artists.  One, whose work … Continue reading Claggett Wilson – War Artist

Paul Nash at the Tate

During my travels I have come to love Paul Nash as his work was so varied and always interesting whether it is about the embodying of humanity in nature; the destruction of war on the land and soul or a surrealist viewpoint of the landscape. The news that there would be a retrospective this year … Continue reading Paul Nash at the Tate

Nevinson’s ‘Broken Reeds’

Studying this work by CRW Nevinson, 'Rain and Mud After the Battle' brought to mind a poem by Edward Thomas from 1916, called 'Rain': Rain, midnight rain, nothing but the wild rain  On this bleak hut, and solitude, and me  Remembering again that I shall die  And neither hear the rain nor give it thanks  … Continue reading Nevinson’s ‘Broken Reeds’

Paul Nash Mash Up 

My love of war art knows no bounds and Paul Nash is an absolute favourite. His 1942 Totes Meer is the graveyard of war aircraft and is a wonderfully cold sea of twisted metal; a metaphor for the mangled bodies of the war. Last week, I was reading something about Caspar David Friedrich, the German, … Continue reading Paul Nash Mash Up